2004
Volume 51, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 2542-6583
  • E-ISSN: 2590-3268

Abstract

Abstract

The article describes the history of Jan Nat’s Hebrew grammar from the first (1936) till the tenth (1996) edition. The revisions by Nat himself, Koopmans, Lettinga and Muraoka reflect the developments that took place in the study of Hebrew in the course of this century. These include the dominance and subsequent decline of the historical-comparative method of Bauer-Leander and Brockelmann, the discovery of new material (Ugarit, Qumran) and the attempts of Meyer and others to incorporate it into the description of Hebrew, and the application of new insights from general linguistics and comparative Semitics to Hebrew grammar. The substantial changes made in the new, tenth edition in relation to the ninth are also illustrated.

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/content/journals/10.5117/NTT1997.3.002.PEUR
1997-07-01
2022-10-07
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