2004
Volume 61, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2542-6583
  • E-ISSN: 2590-3268

Abstract

The Bremen was a driving force in the Reformed confessionalisation process in Europe. Between 1610 and 1810 the Academy counted 7,680 students and 201 professors. In this quantitative-prosopographic description of the ’s corps of theology professors, geographical origins, education, careers, social class, payment, and matrimonial affiliations are compared with those of professors of the other Bremen faculties, and of the university of Franeker (1585–1811). The Bremen group proves more excellent and less given to travel, but also less internationally oriented and affluent than their Franeker colleagues. Elites were in fact formed, but only partly through migration.

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/content/journals/10.5117/NTT2007.61.030.JANS
2007-02-01
2021-11-29
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/NTT2007.61.030.JANS
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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