2004
Volume 73, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 2542-6583
  • E-ISSN: 2590-3268

Abstract

Abstract

Birgir Gerhardsson’s (1961) challenged the field of New Testament Studies by arguing that both the New Testament and rabbinic traditions were originally oral traditions that – even after being written down – continued to be transmitted orally. Although Gerhardsson’s book met severe criticism initially, this article shows that more than half a century after its first publication, Gerhardsson’s work has found positive reappraisal in modern scholarship, even though it is outdated in several aspects. After sketching both the outline of the book and its reception this article discusses the personal experience of the author in studying and teaching Gerhardsson’s important study.

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/content/journals/10.5117/NTT2019.4.003.KOET
2019-11-01
2022-05-17
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