2004
Volume 75, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2542-6583
  • E-ISSN: 2590-3268

Abstract

Abstract

While studies of the earliest Christian centuries abound, little work has been done on the networks that connected early Christian collectives together and how these networks shaped the trajectories of earliest Christianity.1 The history of early Christianity has largely been told through doctrinal developments or controversies and from the perspective of Christian triumphalism. The argument that I present here focuses on resituating our historiography on networks: the people and things that traversed and formed relationships across geographic space through the expenditure of capital, time, effort, and risk. A rethinking of the history of early Christianity could and should begin with paying attention to how ideas moved from one place to another, who was involved in moving those ideas, and what did it cost to do so.

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/content/journals/10.5117/NTT2021.2.005.CONC
2021-06-01
2021-10-22
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/NTT2021.2.005.CONC
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): 1 Clement; Corinth; Dionysios of Corinth; early Christians; Hegesippus; networks
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