2004
Volume 47, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1781-7838
  • E-ISSN: 1783-1792

Abstract

Abstract

One of the most fascinating products of late antique Judaism is , a collection of hymns sung by an assortment of God’s creatures in His praise. Thus far ample research has been conducted mostly into the manuscript traditions of . The early modern Amsterdam Yiddish print editions have, however, escaped extensive analysis.

This article provides an in-depth analysis of the paratexts of both the Yiddish and the Hebrew Amsterdam stand-alone editions (1692). My main methodology will be a paratextual analysis, using the theory developed by Gérard Genette and introduced into the field of early modern Yiddish studies by the late Shlomo Berger. The spiritual utility of the book in Yiddish is at the forefront, explaining its potential audience how the book would enhance their religious observance. This research is located at the intersection of the study of early modern Ashkenaz, Amsterdam book history and Yiddish scholarship. This article introduces and examines the paratexts of the Amsterdam Yiddish and Hebrew editions (1692), and reinforces the process of transmission of piety in early modern Ashkenaz through Yiddish.

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