2004
Volume 48, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1781-7838
  • E-ISSN: 1783-1792

Abstract

Abstract

Beginning in the 1630s, Dutch Brazil sheltered the first openly-Jewish community in the Americas. In 1645, however, Catholic rebels overran the sugar-producing hinterland of the colony, executed Jewish prisoners, and besieged the capital.

This article analyses Jewish community leaders’ responses to these disasters. First, Jews demonstrated their loyalty and petitioned Dutch authorities to gain protection against both their Catholic enemies and their Protestant neighbours. Next, Jewish leaders leveraged their relationship with the government to gain authority over all Jews in Dutch Brazil. Finally, Jews gained representation in decisions affecting the entire colony, although their newfound political power was insufficient to prevent the colony’s surrender in 1654.

Veterans of Dutch Brazil helped found the Jewish communities of New Amsterdam, Curaçao, Suriname, Barbados, and Jamaica. Thus, analyzing communal strategies in the tumultuous final decade of Dutch Brazil enriches our understanding of the next phase of Atlantic Jewish history.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/SR2022.2.002.PERL
2022-12-01
2023-06-05
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/17817838/48/2/SR2022.2.002.PERL.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5117/SR2022.2.002.PERL&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Calado, Manuel. O Valeroso Lucideno, Belo Horizonte: Itatiaia, 1987.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Emmanuel, I.S.“New Light on Early American Jewry.”American Jewish Archives vol. 7, no. 1 (1955): 3–64.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Mello, José Antônio Gonsalves de. Testamento do General Francisco Barreto de Menezes; A cartografia holandesa do Recife; A rendição dos holandeses no Recife (1654). Recife: Cepe Editora, 2017.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Samuel Oppenheim Collection, American Jewish Historical Society.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Wiznitzer, Arnold. The Records of the Earliest Jewish Community in the New World. New York: American Jewish Historical Society, 1954.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Ben-Ur, Aviva. Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society: Suriname in the Atlantic World, 1651–1825. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Bodian, Miriam. Hebrews of the Portuguese Nation: Conversos and Community in Early Modern Amsterdam. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Emmanuel, I.S.“Seventeenth-Century Brazilian Jewry: A Critical Review.”American Jewish Archives (April1962): 32–68.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Feitler, Bruno. Inquisition, juifs et nouveaux-chrétiens au Brésil: Le nordeste, XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2003.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Feitler, Bruno. “Jews and New Christians in Dutch Brazil, 1630–1654.” In Atlantic Diasporas: Jews, Conversos, and Crypto-Jews in the Age of Mercantilism, 1500-1800, edited by Richard L.Kagan and Philip D.Morgan, 123–151. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Gelfand, Noah L.“A People Within and Without: International Jewish Commerce and Community in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Dutch Atlantic World.” PhD diss., New York University, 2008.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Haefeli, Evan. “Breaking the Christian Atlantic: The Legacy of Dutch Tolerance in Brazil.” In The Legacy of Dutch Brazil, edited by Michielvan Groesen, 124-145. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Israel, Jonathan. Diasporas Within a Diaspora: Jews, Crypto-Jews, and the World of Maritime Empires (1540-1740). Boston: Brill, 2002.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Israel, Jonathan. “Religious Toleration in Dutch Brazil.” In The Expansion of Tolerance: Religion in Dutch Brazil, by Jonathan I.Israel and Stuart B.Schwartz, 13-32. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2007.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Klooster, Wim. The Dutch Moment: War, Trade, and Settlement in the Seventeenth-Century Atlantic World. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Klooster, Wim. “The Essequibo Liberties: The Link between Jewish Brazil and Jewish Suriname.”Studia Rosenthaliana42/43 (2010–2011): 77–82.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Levy, Daniela. De Recife para Manhattan: os Judeus na formação de Nova York. São Paulo: Planeta, 2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Maghidman, Marcelo. “Mosseh Rephael d’Aguilar: Origens da literatura judaica em português no Brasil holandês.” PhD diss., Universidade de São Paulo, 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Mello, José Antônio Gonsalves de. Tempo dos Flamengos: influência da ocupação holandesa na vida e na cultura do norte do Brasil. 3rd ed. Recife: Fundação Joaquim Nabuco, 1987.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Mello, José Antônio Gonsalves de. Gente da Nação: Cristãos-novos e judeus em Pernambuco 1542–1654. Recife: Fundação Joaquim Nabuco, 1989.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Meuwese, Mark. Brothers in Arms. Partners in Trade: Dutch-Indigenous Alliances in the Atlantic World, 1595–1674. Leiden: Brill, 2012.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Roitman, Jessica. “Creating Confusion in the Colonies: Jews, Citizenship, and the Dutch and British Atlantics.”Itinerario36:2 (August2012): 55-90.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Vainfas, Ronaldo. Jerusalém colonial: Judeus portugueses no Brasil holandês. Rio de Janeiro: Civilização Brasileira, 2010.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Van den Tol, Joris. Lobbying in Company: Economic Interests and Political Decision Making in the History of Dutch Brazil, 1621–1656. Boston: Brill, 2020.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Weitman, Y. David. Bandeirantes Espirituais do Brasil. São Paulo: Editora Mayaanot, 2003.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wiznitzer, Arnold. “The Exodus from Brazil and Arrival in New Amsterdam of the Jewish Pilgrim Fathers, 1654.”Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, vol. 44, no. 2 (1954): 80–97.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Wiznitzer, Arnold. “The Jews in the Sugar Industry of Colonial Brazil.”Jewish Social Studies, vol. 18, no. 3 (1956): 189–198.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Wiznitzer, Arnold. Jews in Colonial Brazil. New York: Columbia University Press, 1960.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/SR2022.2.002.PERL
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error