2004
Volume 18, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 1388-3186
  • E-ISSN: 2352-2437

Abstract

Abstract

Women, particularly in the colonial context, have often been reduced to a gender-specific role, subjected to patriarchal rule. The historical agency exercised by the street vendors in Brazil’s eighteenth-century diamond district, however, is indicative for a female contribution to historical change on different terms. This article discusses the public and economic participation of these Afro-Brazilian street vendors. As such, an analysis of these borrows from and fits within theoretical models developed by postcolonial scholars, subaltern studies, and a number of Brazilian historians working on women’s history and slave studies.

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2015-09-01
2021-10-21
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Brazilian history; colonialism; diamonds; sexuality; slavery; smuggling; women
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