The dark and divine feminine | Amsterdam University Press Journals Online
2004
Volume 26, Issue 3/4
  • ISSN: 1388-3186
  • E-ISSN: 2352-2437

Abstract

Abstract

This article discusses the TikTok trends on deified forms of (post)femininities posted under the regularly co-occurring hashtags: #darkfemininity, #divinefemininity, and #feminineenergy. Through digital methods in tandem with feminist critical discourse analysis, this research clarifies, construes, and contextualizes these trends and developments in their historical as well as contemporary contexts. It addresses the current multimodal discourses and network around dark and divine femininities on TikTok as well as how these post-femininities dialectically relate to the (post)modernist episteme and its theological heritage of Christianity, questioning if this postfeminist affective public leads to subversion or subjugation of these subjective positions and systemic inequalities.

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2023-12-01
2024-02-29
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