2004
Volume 41, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1573-9775
  • E-ISSN: 2352-1236

Abstract

Abstract

This paper presents two studies on the role of similarity in the processing of narratives. In Experiment 1 ( = 83), female students were presented with one of two versions of a story about the severe consequences of breast cancer. In the similar version, the protagonist was a 22-year-old female student; in the dissimilar version, the protagonist was a 59-year-old working woman. Experiment 2 ( = 62) was an online replication of the first study, with an added measure of perceived similarity.

Neither in Experiment 1 nor in Experiment 2 significant differences were found between the two versions on identification, attitude, or intention. Mediation analyses in Experiment 2 did show that the manipulation of similarity had a significant influence on identification, transportation, emotions, and intentions, via perceived similarity. These findings suggest that manipulating similarity may influence persuasion, but only when this similarity is perceived as such by the participants.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2019.1.016.OOMS
2019-04-01
2022-05-21
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/15739775/41/1/16_TVT2019.1_OOMS.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2019.1.016.OOMS&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Abbott, H.P.(2002). The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Braddock, K., & Dillard, J.P.(2016). Meta-analytic evidence for the persuasive effect of narratives on beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behaviors. Communication Monographs, 83(4), 446-467.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Chen, M., Bell, R.A., & Taylor, L.D.(2016). Narrator point of view and persuasion in health narratives: The role of protagonist-reader similarity, identification, and self-referencing. Journal of Health Communication, 21(8), 908-918.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Chen, M., Bell, R.A., & Taylor, L.D.(2017). Persuasive effects of point of view, protagonist competence, and similarity in a health narrative about type 2 diabetes. Journal of Health Communication, 22(8), 702-712.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Cohen, J.(1977). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (Rev. ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cohen, J.(2001). Defining identification: A theoretical look at the identification of audiences with media characters. Mass Communication & Society, 4(3), 245-264.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Cohen, J., Weimann-Saks, D., & Mazor-Tregerman, M.(2017). Does character similarity increase identification and persuasion?Media Psychology, 21(3), 506-528.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. De Graaf, A., Sanders, J., Beentjes, H., & Hoeken, H.(2007). De rol van identificatie in narrative overtuiging. Tijdschrift voor Taalbeheersing, 29(3), 237-250.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. De Graaf, A., Sanders, J., & Hoeken, H.(2016). Characteristics of narrative interventions and health effects: A review of the content, form, and context of narratives in health-related narrative persuasion research. Review of Communication Research, 4, 88-131.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. De Hoog, N., Stroebe, W., & De Wit, J.B.F.(2008). The processing of fear-arousing communications: How biased processing leads to persuasion. Social Influence, 3(2), 84-113.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Dillard, J.P., Plotnick, C.A., Godbold, L.C., Freimuth, V.S., & Edgar, T.(1996). The multiple affective outcomes of AIDS PSAs: Fear appeals do more than scare people. Communication Research, 23(1), 44-72.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Faul, F., Erdfelder, E., Lang, A.-G., & Buchner, A.(2007). G*Power 3: A flexible statistical power analysis program for the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences. Behavior Research Methods, 39, 175-191.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Fishbein, M., & Ajzen, I.(2010). Predicting and Changing Behavior: The Reasoned Action Approach. New York, NY: Psychology Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Green, M.C., & Brock, T.C.(2000). The role of transportation in the persuasiveness of public narratives. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(5), 701-721.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Hayes, A.F.(2009). Beyond Baron and Kenny: Statistical mediation analysis in the new millennium. Communication Monographs, 76(4), 408-420.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Hayes, A.F.(2013). Introduction to Mediation, Moderation, and Conditional Process Analysis: A Regression-based Approach. New York, NY: Guilford Publications.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Hoeken, H., Kolthoff, M., & Sanders, J.(2016). Story perspective and character similarity as drivers of identification and narrative persuasion. Human Communication Research, 42(2), 292-311.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Igartua, JJ., Wojcieszak, M., Cachón-Ramón, D., & Guerrero-Martín, I.(2017). “If it hooks you, share it on social networks”. Joint effects of character similarity and imagined contact on the intention to share a short narrative in favor of immigration. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 72, 1085-1106.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Igartua, JJ., & Fiuza, D.(2018). Persuading with narratives against gender violence. Effect of similarity with the protagonist on identification and risk-perception. Palabra Clave, 21(2), 499-523.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. McCroskey, J.C., Richmond, V.P., & Daly, J.A.(1975). The development of a measure of perceived homophily in interpersonal communication. Human Communication Research, 1(4), 323-332.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Moyer-Gusé, E., & Nabi, R.L.(2010). Explaining the effects of narrative in an entertainment television program: Overcoming resistance to persuasion. Human Communication Research, 36, 26-52.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. O’Keefe, D.J.(2016). Persuasion: Theory and Research (3rd ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Sage.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Oliver, M.B., Dillard, J.P., Bae, K., & Tamul, D.J.(2012). The effect of narrative news format on empathy for stigmatized groups. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 89(2), 205-224.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Ooms, J.A., Jansen, C.J.M., Hommes, S., & Hoeks, J.C.J.(2017). “Don’t Make My Mistake”: On the Processing of Narrative Fear Appeals. International Journal of Communication, 11, 4924-4945.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Slater, M.D. & Rouner, D.(2002). Entertainment-education and elaboration likelihood:
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Understanding 
the processing of narrative persuasion. Communication Theory, 12(2), 173-191.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Tal-Or, N., & Cohen, J.(2010). Understanding audience involvement: Conceptualizing and manipulating identification and transportation. Poetics, 38, 402-418.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Tao, C-C., & Bucy, E.P.(2007). Conceptualizing media stimuli in experimental research: Psychological versus attribute-based definitions. Human Communication Research, 33(4), 397-426.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2019.1.016.OOMS
Loading
/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2019.1.016.OOMS
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): emotions; health communication; identification; narratives; similarity; transportation
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error