2004
Volume 25, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0921-5077
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7235

Abstract

Models in the psychology of work and health: Objectivity and realism through qualitative methods?

Models in the psychology of work and health: Objectivity and realism through qualitative methods?

This article focuses on the extent to which three influential psychosocial work stress models are related to organizational reality. In addition, the question is answered to what extent these models provide insight into the interplay of personal and situational determinants of well-being, health and work-related performance. The models are found to differ in their connection with reality, by means of the presence or absence of ‘qualitative’ methods (De Groot, 1961). Both research and practice are supposed to benefit from the combination of the unique positive points in the respective models, like the distinction of subjective and objective aspects in the Michigan Person-Environment Fit model and the interplay of demands, resources, engagement, burnout and performance as proposed in the Job Demands-Resources model. Furthermore, it is recommended to combine quantitative and qualitative methods in short ‘empirical cycles’ and to employ insights and techniques from neighbouring disciplines, especially with regard to the acquisition and measurement of job-related knowledge.

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2012-09-01
2022-01-20
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