2004
Volume 51, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0165-8204
  • E-ISSN: 2667-1573

Abstract

Summary

In 2000, a lead curse tablet was found in Bodegraven, at or near the site of a small Roman fort on the southern bank of the river Rhine. The text was first examined and interpreted by Jan Kees Haalebos (Haalebos and Polak 2007), who recognized a list of 21 personal names and the first word of a closing formula of four short lines. In the present article a drawing of the tablet is published for the first time and a new reading of the text is proposed. The list of names is reduced to 20 and alternative readings are introduced for some of the names. Subsequently, an interpretation is presented for the incompletely preserved closing lines. The resulting text uses standard formulae, all well-known from other curse tablets. For the first time, however, we find the word in the context of a curse, used in the ‘wish formula’ directed against the intended victims.

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/content/journals/10.5117/LAM2018.3.003.SWIN
2018-01-01
2022-05-17
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