2004
Volume 54 Number 2
  • ISSN: 0165-8204
  • E-ISSN: 2667-1573

Abstract

Abstract

General introductions to the ancient Olympic Games often paint an idealized picture of intrinsically motivated and fair athletes, competing purely for the honour of the victory. From a scholarly point of view, this image has been adjusted in recent years: also among the ancient athletes there were certainly some who cheated. As the topic of fairness and cheating is very accessible to younger students, this theme is well-suited for classes on ancient culture: it invites them to think about idealizations of the past, and about their own ideas on fair sport. A passage on Olympic cheaters from the travel guide of Pausanias (5.21.2-18) offers a convenient entry point to the topic. As this author is not part of standard school curricula, working with a modern translation would be a logical choice. This article consists of two parts: a historical introduction to the reality of cheating at ancient Olympia, discussing the rules, types of offenses and the most common punishments, and a didactic part, which offers examples of the kind of questions that can be raised in class around this topic, and suggestions how to employ translated sources in your classes.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/LAM2021.2.007.OEVE
2021-01-01
2021-10-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Crowther, N.B.1997. ‘Sed quis custodiet ipsos custodes? The impartiality of the Olympic judges and the case of Leon of Ambracia’, Nikephoros10, 149-160.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Crowther, N.B. en M.Frass1998. ‘Flogging as a Punishment in the Ancient Games’, Nikephoros11, 51-82.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Eidinow, E.2007. Oracles, Curses and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, Oxford.
  4. Forbes, C.A.1952. ‘Crime and Punishment in Greek Athletics’, The Classical Journal47, 169-173 en 202-203.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Hoogendijk, C.2016. ‘Matchfixing in Romeins Egypte’, Hermeneus88, 98-103.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. König, J.2005. Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire, Cambridge.
  7. Nijf, O.M. van. 2021. ‘Saxa Loquuntur. Bibliografisch en heuristisch overzicht’, Lampas54.1, 161-171.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Remijsen, S.2014. ‘Greek Sport in Egypt. Status symbol and lifestyle’, in P.Christesen en D.G.Kyle (eds), A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity, Chicester, 349-363.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Remijsen, S.2019. ‘Only Greeks at the Olympics? Reconsidering the rule against non-Greeks at ‘Panhellenic’ Games’, Classica et Mediaevalia67, 1-67.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Romano, D.G.2007. ‘Judges and Judging at the Ancient Olympic Games’, in G.P.Schaus en S.R.Wenn (eds), Onward to the Olympics. Historical perspectives on the Olympic Games, Ontario, 95-113.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Siewert, P.1992. ‘The Olympic Rules’, in W.Coulson en H.Kyrieleis (eds), Proceedings of an International Symposium on the Olympic Games. 5-9 September 1988, Athene, 113-117.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Tremel, J.2004. Magica agonistica. Fluchtafeln im antiken Sport (Nikephoros. Beihefte 10), Hildesheim.
  13. WeilerI.1985-1986. ‘Der “Niedergang” und das Ende der antiken Olympischen Spiele in der Forschung’, Grazer Beiträge12-13, 235-263.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Zoumbaki, S.2011. ‘Hellanodiken außerhalb von Olympia’, Tekmeria10, 7-21.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/LAM2021.2.007.OEVE
Loading
/content/journals/10.5117/LAM2021.2.007.OEVE
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error