2004
Volume 76 Number 4
  • ISSN: 2542-6583
  • E-ISSN: 2590-3268

Abstract

Abstract

As part of NTT JTSR’s series on Key Texts, the present article discusses David Abulafia’s monograph . It explains Abulafia’s approach to the Mediterranean as a distinctive region in the context of the wider field of Mediterranean studies. The article then explores the potential impact of Abulafia’s specific approach on the study of Judaism and Christianity from the Graeco-Roman period, taking several Jewish and Christian literary texts from the early Roman Empire as case studies. It is suggested that Abulafia’s transmaritime approach to the Mediterranean as a region offers a range of potential research avenues that has not yet been exploited by scholars of ancient Judaism and early Christianity, inviting us to recognise the pivotal role of the Mediterranean Sea in ancient Judaism and early Christianity, both as a topos and as a shaping force.

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2022-12-01
2023-06-02
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