2004
Volume 23, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1388-3186
  • E-ISSN: 2352-2437

Abstract

Abstract

In the Netherlands, the redistribution of unpaid housework from women to men is very limited, despite the fact that women’s labour force participation and level of education have increased significantly over the past decade. We use the feminist economic household bargaining approach to analyse male partners’ contribution to housework, with primary data from heterosexual couples. We collected the data from two mutually exclusive groups who either supply or demand paid household services through two online agencies. The results show that, for the lower-class households (those supplying services), men do more unpaid housework when their female partner earns a relatively high income. For the higher-class households (those demanding services), we find no such effect for women’s income. Instead, we find that, when men earn relatively high incomes, they reduce their contribution to housework. Moreover, we find that, with a higher family income, more paid household services are hired. We conclude that, for the lower class, income insecurity seems to stimulate men to do more housework, allowing women to do more paid work, whereas, for the higher class, more personal and more family income appears to be an escape for men from doing more housework.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/TVGN2020.2.004.SENT
2020-06-01
2022-01-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/13883186/23/2/05_TVGN2020.2_SENT.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5117/TVGN2020.2.004.SENT&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aassve, A., Fuochi, G., & Mencarini, L.(2014). Desperate housework: Relative resources, time availability, economic dependency, and gender ideology across Europe. Journal of Family Issues, 35(8), 1000–1022.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Agarwal, B.(1997). Bargaining and gender relations: Within and beyond the household. Feminist Economics, 3(1), 1–51.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bavel, J. van, Schwartz, C., & Esteve, A.(2018). The reversal of the gender gap in education and its consequences for family life. Annual Review of Sociology, 44, 341-360.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Baxter, J., & Hewitt, B.(2013). Negotiating domestic labour: Women’s earnings and housework time in Australia. Feminist Economics, 19(1), 29–53.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Baxter, J., Hewitt, B., & Western, M.(2009). Who uses paid domestic labor in Australia? Choice and constraint in hiring household help. Feminist Economics, 15(1), 1–26.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Becker, G.(1981). Treatise on the family. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  7. Bittman, M., England, P., Folbre, N., Sayer, L., & Matheson, G.(2003). When does gender trump money? Bargaining and time in household work. American Journal of Sociology, 109(1), 186–214.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Blood, R., & Wolfe, D.(1960). Husbands and wives. The Dynamics of Married Living. Glencoe: The Free Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Boelhouwer, J., Kraaykamp, G., & Stoop, I. (Red.). (2015). Nederland in Europees perspectief. Tevredenheid, vertrouwen en opinies. Den Haag: Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau.
  10. Braun, M., Lewin-Epstein, N., Stier, H., & Baumgartner, M.(2008). Perceived equity in the gendered division of household labor. Journal of Marriage and Family, 70, 1145–1156.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Brines, J.(1994). Economic dependency, gender, and the division of labor at home. American Journal of Sociology, 100(3), 652–688.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Carrasco, C., & Domínguez, M.(2011). Family strategies for meeting care and domestic work needs: Evidence from Spain. Feminist Economics, 17(4), 159–188.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Craig, L.(2016). Domestic outsourcing, housework time, and subjective time pressure: New insights from longitudinal data. Journal of Marriage and Family, 78, 1224–1236.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. D’Aspremont, C., & Dos Santos Farreira, R.(2014). Household behaviour and individual autonomy: An extended Lindahl mechanism. Economic Theory, 55, 643–663.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Davis, S., & Wills, J.(2014). Theoretical explanations amid social change: A content analysis of housework research (1975–2012). Journal of Family Issues, 35(6), 808–824.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Folbre, N., & Nelson, J.(2000). For love or money–Or both?The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(4), 123–140.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Geist, C., & Ruppanner, L.(2018). Mission impossible? New housework theories for changing families. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 10, 242–262.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Genadek, K.(2018). Unilateral divorce and time allocation in the United States. Feminist Economics, 24(1), 63–87.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Gupta, J., & Ash, M.(2008). Whose money, whose time? A nonparametric approach to modelling time spent on housework in the United States. Feminist Economics, 14(1), 93–120.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Himmelweit, S., Santos, C., Sevilla, A., & Sofer, C.(2013). Sharing of resources within the family and the economics of household decision making. Journal of Marriage and Family, 75, 625–639.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Kornrich, S., & Roberts, A.(2018). Household income, women’s earnings, and spending on household services, 1980–2010. Journal of Marriage and Family, 80, 150–165.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Lachance-Grzela, M., & Bouchard, G.(2010). Why do women do the lions’ share of housework? A decade of research. Sex Roles, 63, 767–780.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Lyonette, C., & Crompton, R.(2015). Sharing the load? Partners’ relative earnings and the division of domestic labour. Work, Employment and Society, 29(1), 23–40.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Mabsout, R., & Van Staveren, I.(2010). Disentangling bargaining power from individual and household level to institutions: Evidence on women’s position in Ethiopia. World Development, 38(5), 783–796.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Maume, D.(2016). Can men make time for family? Paid work, care work, work-family reconciliation policies, and gender equality. Social Currents, 3(1), 43–63.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Merens, A., & Bucx, F.(2018). Werken aan de start. Jonge vrouwen en mannen op de arbeidsmarkt. Den Haag: Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau.
  27. Merens, A., Bucx, F., & Meng, C.(2017). Eerste treden op de arbeidsmarkt. Den Haag: Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau.
  28. Odebode, S., & Van Staveren, I.(2007). Gender norms as asymmetric institutions. A case study of Yoruba women in Nigeria. Journal of Economic Issues, 4(4), 903–925.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Oppenheimer, V.(1997). Women’s employment and the gain to marriage: The specialization and trading model. Annual Review of Sociology, 23, 431–453.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Portegijs, W., & Van den Brakel, M. (Red.). (2016). Emancipatiemonitor 2016. Den Haag: Sociaal Cultureel Planbureau.
  31. Roeters, A. (2017a). Een week in kaart (1e editie). Den Haag: Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Roeters, A. (2017b). Leren van Verschillen. Opleidingsverschillen in de vrouwenemancipatie. Den Haag: Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau.
  33. Ruitenberg, J.(2014). A typology of Dutch mothers’ employment narratives: Drifters, privilegeds, balancers, ambitious. Gender Issues, 31, 58–82.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Sen, A.(1990). Gender and cooperative conflict. In I.Tinker (Red.), Persistent inequalities: Women and world development (pp. 123–148). New York: Oxford University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Tamilina, L., & Tamilina, N.(2014). The impact of welfare states on the division of housework in the family: A new comprehensive theoretical and empirical framework of analysis. Journal of Family Issues, 35(6), 825–850.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Thébaud, S.(2010). Masculinity, bargaining and breadwinning – Understanding men’s housework in the cultural context of paid work. Gender and Society, 24(3), 330–354.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Van Bavel, J., Schwartz, C., & Esteve, A.(2018). The reversal of the gender gap in education and its consequences for family life. Annual Review of Sociology, 44, 341–360.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. West, C., & Zimmerman, D.H.(1987). Doing gender. Gender & Society, 1, 125–151.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Wiesmann, S., Boeije, H., Van Doorne-Huiskes, A., & Den Dulk, L.(2008). Not worth mentioning: The implicit and explicit nature of decision-making about the division of paid and domestic work. Community, Work & Family, 11(4), 341–363.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Windebank, J.(1995). Dual-earner couples in Britain and France: Gender divisions of domestic labour and parenting work in different welfare states. Work, Employment & Society, 15(2), 269–290.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/TVGN2020.2.004.SENT
Loading
/content/journals/10.5117/TVGN2020.2.004.SENT
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error