2004
Volume 40, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 1573-9775
  • E-ISSN: 2352-1236

Abstract

Abstract

In this article I present a conversation analysis of openings of calls between callers and call-takers from a Dutch information helpline. In openings of institutional interactions, the participants present their situational identities, for example information provider and information seeker. In rare cases, the articulated identities do not fit together and the speakers’ turns are directed towards different interactional activities (projects). This has also been called interactional asynchronicity. The openings of the Dutch alcohol and drugs information service are characterized by project shifts and problems of alignment related to the caller’s question. These appear to be related to the difference between asking for information versus information that is of relevance. Callers sometimes align with the call takers’ self-categorisation with “alcohol/drugs info line” with a question for general information. However, they frequently shift to a question with personal relevance for instance by using self-repair. When callers do ask for general information, call takers sometimes do not directly answer the question, but look for a personal motivation for the question from the caller. In case they don’t, this may lead to interactional asynchronicity. Information provision as the primary focus of the helpline does not seem to optimally support the service.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2018.3.002.STOM
2018-12-01
2021-10-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/15739775/40/3/02_TVT2018.3_STOM.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2018.3.002.STOM&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Antaki, C. (Ed.). (2011). Applied Conversation Analysis: interventions and changes in institutional talk. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Danby, S., Baker, C., & Emmison, M.(2005). Four observations on openings in calls to Kids Help Line. In C.Baker, Emmison, M. & A. Firth (Ed.), Calling for Help: Language and social interaction in telephone helplines (pp. 133-151). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Drew, P., & Heritage, J.(1992). Talk at work: interaction in institutional settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Egan, G.(2007). Expert counseling [Deskundig hulpverlenen]. Assen: Van Gorcum.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Heritage, J., & Clayman, S.(2010). Talk in action. Interactions, identities and institutions. Oxford: Blackwell.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Houtkoop-Steenstra, H.(1990). Opening sequences in Dutch telephone conversations. In 
D.Boden & D.H.Zimmerman (Eds.), Talk and social structure. Studies in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis (pp. 232-250). Cambridge: Polity Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Jefferson, G.(2004). Glossary of transcript symbols with an introduction. In G.Lerner (Ed.), Conversation analysis: Studies from the first generation (pp. 14-31). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Jefferson, G., & Lee, J.(1981). The rejection of advice: managing the problematic convergence of ‘troubles-telling’ and a ‘service encounter’. Journal of Pragmatics, 5, 399-422.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kitzinger, C.(2013). Repair. In J.Sidnell & T.Stivers (Eds.), The Handbook of Conversation Analysis (pp. n.p.). Blackwell Reference Online: Blackwell Publishing.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Labov, W., & Waletzky, J.(1967). Narrative analysis: Oral versions of personal experience. In J.Holm (Ed.), Essays on the Verbal and Visual Arts (pp. 12-44). Seattle: University of Washington Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Leppänen, V.(2005). Callers’ presentation of problems in telephone calls to Swedish primary care. In C.Baker, M. Emmison, & A. Firth (Eds.), Calling for help (pp. 177-206). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Peräkylä, A., & Vehviläinen, S.(2003). Conversation Analysis and the professional stocks of interactional knowledge. Discourse and Society, 14(6), 727-750.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Raymond, G., & Zimmerman, D.(2016). Closing matters: Alignment and misalignment in sequence and call closings in institutional interaction. Discourse Studies, 18(6), 716-736. doi: doi:10.1177/1461445616667141
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Sacks, H., Schegloff, E., & Jefferson, G.(1974). A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking in conversation. Language, 50(4), 696-735.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Sacks, H.(1992). Lectures on conversation. Part 1. Oxford: Blackwell.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Schegloff, E.(2007). Sequence organization in interaction: A primer in conversation analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sidnell, J.(2017). Action in interaction is conduct under a description. Language in Society, 46, 313-337. doi: doi:10.1017/S0047404517000173
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Stivers, T., & Robinson, J.(2006). A preference for progressivity in interaction. Language in Society, 35, 367-392. doi: doi:10.10170S0047404506060179
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Stommel, W.(2016). Information giving or problem discussion? Formulations in the initial phase of web-based chat counseling sessions. Journal of Pragmatics, 105, 87-100. doi: doi:doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2016.09.001
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Stommel, W., & Te Molder, H.(2015). Counselling online and over the phone: when pre-closing questions fail as a closing device. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 48(3), 281-300. doi: doi:10.1080/08351813.2015.1058605
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Stommel, W., & Te Molder, H.(2016). When technical affordances meet interactional norms: The value of pre-screening in online chat counseling. PsychNology Journal, 13(2-3), 235-258.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Te Molder, H.(2005). ‘I just want to hear somebody right now’: Managing identities on a telephone helpline. In C. Baker, M. Emmison, & A. Firth (Eds.), Calling for help: Language and social interaction in telephone helplines (pp. 153-173). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Ten Have, P.(2007). Doing conversation analysis; a practical guide. London: Sage Publications.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Whalen, J., Zimmerman, D.H., & Whalen, M.R.(1988). When words fail: A signle case analysis. Social Problems, 35(4), 335-362.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Whalen, M., & Zimmerman, D.(1987). Sequential and institutional contexts in calls for help. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50(2), 172-185. doi: doi:10.1177/019027250907200406
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Zimmerman, D.(1998). Identity, context and interaction. In C. Antaki & S. Widdicombe (Eds.), Identities in Talk (pp. 87-106). London: Sage Publications.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2018.3.002.STOM
Loading
/content/journals/10.5117/TVT2018.3.002.STOM
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): (mis)alignment; conversation analysis; helpline; identity; information
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error