2004
Volume 20, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0921-5077
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7235

Abstract

Egocentrism in the psychology of procedural justice

Egocentrism in the psychology of procedural justice

J.-W. van Prooijen, Gedrag & Organisatie, volume 20, November 2007, nr. 4, pp. 356-368

Whereas it is often assumed that reactions to decision-making procedures are based on norms, values, and moral principles, in the current contribution I suggest that reactions to decision-making procedures often are to a substantial extent shaped by egocentric concerns. Such egocentrism can be observed in various explanatory theoretical models of procedural justice effects. These models converge on the assumption that people's procedural justice judgments are based on the implications of decision-making procedures for themselves. Recent empirical studies provide evidence for two basic propositions regarding egocentrism in the psychology of procedural justice: (1) People respond more negatively to procedural injustice that happens to themselves than to procedural injustice that happens to others, and (2) an egocentric self-focus amplifies people's fairness-based responses to decision-making procedures. It is concluded that egocentric motives play a central role in the psychology of procedural justice.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/2007.020.004.004
2007-12-01
2022-05-17
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/2007.020.004.004
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error