2004
Volume 35 Number 4
  • ISSN: 0921-5077
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7235

Abstract

Samenvatting

Arbeidsmigranten uit Midden- en Oost-Europa ervaren vaak precaire arbeidsomstandigheden in de laaggeschoolde sectoren in Nederland. Deze studie onderzoekt aan de hand van een narratieve benadering hoe Hongaarse arbeidsmigranten referentiekaders gebruiken bij het interpreteren van hun arbeidsomstandigheden in Nederlandse distributiecentra. Op basis van 18 diepte-interviews destilleren we vier trajecten van referentiekadervorming: (1) van hoog- naar laaggeschoold werk; (2) van laag- naar laaggeschoold werk; (3) veelvuldige tijdelijke uitzendcontracten; en (4) transitionele referentiekadervorming. Naast vergelijkingen tussen thuis en gastland vergelijken migranten hun arbeidsomstandigheden met peers en op basis van hun ervaringen met transities in een internationale context. Arbeidsmigranten gebruiken referentiekaders om de cognitieve dissonantie te verminderen die zij ervaren tijdens precair werk. Dit is vooral zo na trajecten van hooggeschoold naar laaggeschoold, van laaggeschoold naar laaggeschoold, en van tijdelijk werk. Na een opeenvolging van niet-standaardarbeidscontracten lijken arbeidsmigranten precaire arbeidsomstandigheden te accepteren in werk wanneer ze vermoeden dat dit werk zekerheid en stabiliteit geeft voor de toekomst.

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