2004
Volume 18, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1384-5829
  • E-ISSN: 2352-118X

Abstract

Pre-war radio programmes concerning literature are often described in terms of book promotion, either in the sense of cultural mediation or commercial publicity. This article, however, shows that book programmes also functioned as cultural platforms that allowed literary debates and critical issues to be extended from their printed origins into the realm of new media. By exploring the literary programmes of the Protestant broadcasting organisation NCRV, I will argue that, in practice, literary features did not always conform to a broadcaster’s professed ideals of disseminating culture to the listening masses. Although the NCRV’s book programmes intended to inform a broad Christian audience about (recent) works of literature, the oral reviews were occasionally aimed more specifically at the rank and file of the literary institutions that collaborated with the Protestant broadcasting organisation. In addition, a case study of Piet Risseeuw’s activities at the NCRV reveals that personal issues could also affect the practice of radio criticism.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/NEDLET2013.2.DERA
2013-10-01
2022-01-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/NEDLET2013.2.DERA
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error