2004
Volume 20, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 1384-5829
  • E-ISSN: 2352-118X

Abstract

Abstract

Authorship is a ‘trending topic’ in literary studies: specialists from all periods and languages have published widely on various topics such as posture, self-fashioning, and autonomy. This contribution investigates how these recent debates found their way into the new series of literary histories published on behalf of the Taalunie since 2006 (). We discuss this matter along three lines. First, we show that in the different parts of the there are multiple, sometimes contradicting notions of development of authorship. After that, we demonstrate that there does not seem to be a shared terminology: different scholars use words like ‘broodschrijver’ (hack-writer) with dissimilar meanings and connotations. Finally, it is noted that the writers of -volumes do not have the same ideas about how to deal with authorial (re-)presentation in literary texts. We conclude that, although the editors aimed for a series based on shared starting points, there is not a single narrative about authorship in the -series.

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/content/journals/10.5117/NEDLET2015.3.BOUW
2015-10-01
2021-06-15
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): authorial representation; authorship; autonomy; literary history; professionalization
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