2004
Volume 27 Number 3
  • ISSN: 1384-5829
  • E-ISSN: 2352-118X

Abstract

Abstract

In the field of animal studies, there has been an ongoing tradition of critique of anthropomorphism in (literary) representations of animals. To some extent, this critique is understandable: in order to emancipate the animal, this form of human appropriation should be questioned. However, the dangers of anthropomorphism have been qualified by scholars who point out that not anthropomorphism, but rather anthrophodenial – the a priori rejection of any similarities between humans and animals – might hinder an inclusive ecology in which humans and animals are interconnected. In this article, we illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of both anthropomorphism and anthropodenial through an interpretation of five contemporary Dutch literary texts – two children’s books and three novels – in which animals play an important role. Specifically, we analyze stories revolving around a relationship between a human character and a dog as a companion species. Focusing on the ontological, political and narrative dimensions of these stories, we analyze, respectively: to what extent they suggest a binary opposition between human and non-human beings; how they reflect relations of power; and which narrative techniques are employed to represent animals.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/NEDLET.2022.3.007.RAAT
2022-12-01
2023-01-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Baker, Stephen, Picturing the Beast. Animals, Identity, and Representation. Urbana, University of Illinois Press, 2001.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Berger, John, ‘Why Look at Animals?’, in: JohnBerger, About Looking. Londen, Writers and Readers, 1980.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bernaerts, Lars, MarcoCaracciolo, LucHerman & BartVervaeck, ‘The Storied Lives of Non-Human Narrators’, in: Narrative22, 2014, 1, 68-93.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Blount, Margaret, Animal Land. The Creatures of Children’s Fiction. New York, W. Morrow & Co, 1975.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Clark, Timothy, The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2011.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Elick, Catherine, Talking Animals in Children’s Fiction. A Critical Study. Jefferson, North Carolina, McFarland & Co, 2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Feuth, Thijs, Kafka is dood. Amsterdam, De Arbeiderspers, 2020.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Fudge, Erica, Animal. Londen, Reaktion Books, 2002.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Haraway, Donna, Manifestly Haraway. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Herman, David, ‘Storyworld/Umwelt. Nonhuman Experiences in Graphic Narratives’, in: Substance40, 2011a, 1, 156-181.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Herman, David, ‘1880-1945. Re-minding modernism’, in: DavidHerman (red.), Emergence of Mind. Representations of Consciousness in Narrative Discourse. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press, 2011b, 243-272.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Herman, David, Narratology beyond the Human. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hogan, Walter, Animals in Young Adult Fiction. Lanham Maryland, Scarecrow Press, 2009.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Höing, Anja, ‘Unreliability and the Animals Narrator in Richard Adams’sThe Plague Dogs’, in: Humanities6, 2017, 6, 1-13.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Jacques, Zoe, Children’s Literature and the Posthuman. Animal, Environment, Cyborg. London, Routledge, 2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Karlsson, Fredrik, ‘Critical Antropomorphism and Animal Ethics’, in: Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics25, 2012, 707-720.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kollaard, Sander, Uit het leven van een hond. Amsterdam, Van Oorschot. 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Lesnik-Oberstein, Karin, ‘Children’s Literature and the Environment’, in: RichardKerridge & NeilSammells (red.), Writing the Environment. Ecocriticism and Literature. London, Zed Books, 1998, 208-217.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Meijer, Eva, Dagpauwoog. Amsterdam, Cossee, 2013.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Meijer, Eva, Dierentalen. Leusden, ISVW Uitgevers, 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Ortiz-Robles, Mario, Literature and Animal Studies. Londen, Routledge, 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Parry, Catherine, ‘Other Animals and Literary Criticism’, in: dez., Other Animals in Twenty-First Century Fiction. Cham Switzerland, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Plumwood, Val, ‘Journey to the Heart of Stone’, in: IanBeckett & TerryGifford (red.), Culture, Creativity and Environment. Leiden, Brill, 2007, 17-36.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Singer, Peter, Animal Liberation. Londen, The Bodley Head, 2015 [1975].
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Ratelle, Amy, Animality and Children’s Literature and Film. Londen, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Rudd, David, ‘Animal and Object Stories’, in: M.O.Grenby & AndreaImmel (red.), The Cambridge Companion to Children’s Literature. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2009, 242-257.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Sterck, Marite de, De hondeneters. Amsterdam, Querido, 2009.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Woltz, Anna, Alaska. Amsterdam, Querido, 2016.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Vendel, Edward van de, Toen kwam Sam. Amsterdam, Querido, 2011.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Waal, Frans de, ‘Anthropomorphism and Anthropodenial. Consistency in Our Thinking about Humans and Other Animals’, in: Philosophical topics27, 1999, 1, 255-280.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. You, Chengcheng, ‘The Necessity of an Anthropomorphic Approach to Children’s Literature’, in: Child Lit Educ52, 2021, 183-199.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/NEDLET.2022.3.007.RAAT
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error