2004
Volume 122, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0040-7518
  • E-ISSN: 2352-1163

Abstract

The Second World War was the greatest man-made disaster in history. The war destroyed countless human lives and left indelible marks on modern memory. This essay examines the impact of this catastrophic event on economic development. Using a wide array of recent studies in economic history and the history of technology, the author argues that, contrary to what intuition would suggest, the impact was in reality rather limited. A review of data on exports of commodities and capital, technological development, productivity, consumption patterns, and institutional change shows that the only lasting economic effect of the war was its influence on institutions.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/TVGESCH2009.4.DAVI
2009-11-01
2022-01-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/TVGESCH2009.4.DAVI
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error