2004
Volume 133, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0040-7518
  • E-ISSN: 2352-1163

Abstract

Abstract

Developments in Dutch society and government in the first half of the nineteenth century led to changes in archival practices. The newly-established unitary state needed more and different information about society and people, and that information had to be managed and archived. However, after the Restoration in 1813 many traditional archiving practices were reintroduced. Aside from the function of government, collecting and publishing archival documents was not only (as in the eighteenth century) deemed necessary to bolster legal legitimacy, but was seen as a prerequisite for writing local, provincial, and national histories. A small number of cities and provincial governments appointed an archivist to serve the community by collecting and publishing archival documents.

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2020-11-01
2021-10-24
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): archives; archivists; collecting sources; information management
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