2004
Volume 49, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 1384-6930
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7286

Abstract

Samenvatting

Politici verwijzen in hun tweets vaak naar de media. Dergelijke mediaverwijzingen gaan soms gepaard met mediakritiek. Een inhoudsanalyse van tweets van Vlaamse politici toont dat zij de media geregeld bekritiseren, al zijn er verschillen tussen partijen. Populistische mediakritiek of ‘anti-journalistiek’ is hierbij eerder zeldzaam, behalve bij het extreemrechtse Vlaams Belang en bij sommige politici van de Vlaams-nationalistische partij N-VA.

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