2004
Volume 124, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0040-7518
  • E-ISSN: 2352-1163

Abstract

The First World War is considered by many historians to have produced the great cultural turn of the twentieth century. The boom in memory which occurred across Europe after the war is part of its impact. Dutch historians have argued that the Netherlands, as a neutral country, never fully experienced the far-reaching intellectual and cultural consequences of the war. This article questions this proposition by examining how the memory of the First World War appeared in the Netherlands. The author argues that in the interwar period the First World War was remembered publicly in a number of different ways. First, the commemoration of national mobilisation (1924) emphasised the military achievements of this period. Later, in the second half of the 1920s, a memory more oriented towards peace and internationalism dominated the public sphere. Initialized by the No More War Federation, this memory was promoted in particular by means of a Dutch armistice commemoration.

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/content/journals/10.5117/TVGESCH2011.1.MEEK
2011-02-01
2021-12-01
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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