2004
Volume 40, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1567-7109
  • E-ISSN: 2468-1652

Abstract

Abstract

With this study, we (a) analyze the implementation of the parental involvement module of Success for All aimed at enhancing home-based parental literacy involvement in the first, second, and third Grade, and (b) draw lessons from that implementation. For three school years, seven Dutch elementary schools with relatively many students from low socio-economic backgrounds, have implemented the parental involvement module. Afterwards, in-depth interviews with 22 professionals have been conducted. Based on the interview data, two dimensions of implementation have been analyzed: the level of structural implementation and the process of implementation. We distinguished three levels of structural implementation: low, medium, and high. Our analyses reveal that one school obtained a medium level of structural implementation, and the other six a low level. With knowledge of the process of implementation, we interpreted this outcome. Our analyses show that a higher level of structural implementation relies on (1) how the innovation is embedded in the school’s organizational structure, (2) whether or not a program champion (who is supported by coworkers and supervisors) is present, (3) the necessity felt for successful implementation of core elements of the module, (4) the enthusiasm of the school’s staff for the innovation, (5) asking the help of external experts in order to, with joint forces, help solve a blockage in the implementation process and (6) active involvement of parents and positive parental responses.

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2021-09-25
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): beginning readers; elementary schools; implementation; literacy; parental involvement
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