Voedselverleidingen op televisie | Amsterdam University Press Journals Online
2004
Volume 51 Number 4
  • ISSN: 1384-6930
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7286

Abstract

Samenvatting

Tv-kijken speelt een belangrijke rol in de ontwikkeling van obesitas. Een veelgenoemde verklaring hiervoor is dat men op tv voortdurend wordt blootgesteld aan lekker, maar ongezond eten, wat zou aanzetten tot (over) consumptie. Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van doctoraatsonderzoek naar de vraag in hoeverre, voor wie en via welke processen blootstelling aan lekkere eet-cues op tv leidt tot ongezond eetgedrag.

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2024-02-29
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