2004
Volume 91, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0025-9454
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2816

Abstract

Summary

This paper focuses on individual and country-level circumstances shaping friendships between young and old to gain insight into conditions for intergenerational solidarity. Using European Social Survey data, findings show that relatively few people have cross-age friendships (18% of the young and 31% of the old). As predicted by the ‘meeting principle’, individuals who operate in settings where there are opportunities for meaningful interactions with people belonging to a different age group are more likely to have cross-age friendships. As predicted by the ‘disposition principle’, individuals with more favourable feelings about other age groups are more likely to have cross-age friendships. Neither the Active Ageing Index nor macro-level trust and individualism show significant associations with the likelihood of having cross-age friendships. Apparently, conditions that bring generations together are meeting opportunities at the local level, underscoring the importance of decentralized initiatives aimed at increased contact and co-operation across age groups.

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/content/journals/10.5117/MEM2016.2.DYKS
2016-06-01
2021-09-21
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): active ageing; age segregation; ageism; friendship; intergenerational solidarity

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