2004
Volume 92, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0025-9454
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2816

Abstract

Abstract

In this article we examine the labor market outcome of different types of craftsmen. Do vocationally educated craftsmen have a smoother school-to-work transition than graduates with general skills? We analyze this question using Dutch Labor Force Surveys from 1996 to 2012. We find that craftsmen who have a very specialized educational degree are less likely to be unemployed at the start of their careers. However, those with a broader educational degree are more likely to find a job with a higher job status than graduates with a specialized degree. According to the literature, craftsmen with a specialized education are likely to have difficulties later in their career: their specific skills become obsolete while those with a broader education are likely to be able to be more mobile in the labor market. We find no support for this when we analyze unemployment. Craftsmen with a small education remain at least as likely to be employed as craftsmen with a broader education. However, for job status we find more support for this hypothesis. The gap in job status between craftsmen with a small and broad education widens over the life course.

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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): craftsmanship; labor market; segregation indices; vocational education

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