2004
Volume 42, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1567-7109
  • E-ISSN: 2468-1652

Abstract

Abstract

Dutch schools are obliged to teach students to respect sexual diversity, but they can decide on their own how to approach this goal, which seems to create major challenges for Dutch teachers. The authors suggest that lessons in which adolescent literature is used to increase the empathy among students with regard to sexual diversity may be a timely and promising intervention to be implemented in the classroom. This article aims to identify the preconditions for these lessons, through the research questions: 1) How can the didactic and pedagogical approaches of lessons about sexual diversity in the classroom within a school context be adequately designed? 2) How can reading fiction play a role in discussing and countering prejudices and stereotyping of (sexual) minority groups in education and in the classroom? The researchers used the PRISMA manual for a systematic literature review. Findings were summarized and synthesized in a narrative fashion. This article presents the findings of 45 articles retrieved in a systematic literature search. Key findings are that: 1) Sexual diversity is best discussed as positive and inclusive, in a safe classroom environment. Providing support and promoting acceptance is the responsibility of teachers. Teachers can bring about positive change and need training and support from the school and the government for this. 2) It is important that LGB characters in the books to be used are represented in a versatile and positive way, with a clear description of a sexual minority orientation. Consideration should be given to the processing of the story through assignments that encourage empathy.

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2022-07-01
2022-08-12
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