2004
Volume 50, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1384-6930
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7286

Abstract

Samenvatting

Videogames zijn een veelbelovende strategie op het gebied van gezondheidsinterventies voor kinderen, maar de impact ervan kan variëren afhankelijk van de gebruikte game-elementen. Deze studie onderzocht prestatiegerelateerde gamebeloningen en hun ontwerp onder preadolescenten (8-12 jaar) om het effect ervan te beoordelen en om uit te leggen hoe ze werken. In een 2 (beloningsprestatiesysteem: sociaal vs. persoonlijk) x 2 (beloningscontext: in-game vs. out-game) tussen-proefpersonenontwerp, werden 178 kinderen willekeurig toegewezen aan één van de vier condities. Bevindingen gaven aan dat een ‘persoonlijk’ prestatiesysteem (gebaseerd op eigen hoge scores) tot meer aandacht en minder frustratie leidde dan een ‘sociaal’ prestatiesysteem (dat ook hoge scores van anderen laat zien), wat vervolgens de motivatie van kinderen verhoogde om gezonde voeding te kiezen. Bovendien waren ‘out-game’-beloningen (tastbare stickers toegewezen buiten de game-omgeving) aantrekkelijker dan ‘in-game’-beloningen (virtuele stickers toegewezen binnen de game-omgeving), wat leidde tot meer tevredenheid en daarmee tot een hogere motivatie om gezonde voeding te kiezen.

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