Sociale mediawijsheid bij adolescenten | Amsterdam University Press Journals Online
2004
Volume 51, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1384-6930
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7286

Abstract

Samenvatting

Sociale media worden vaak verantwoordelijk geacht voor de dalende mentale gezondheid van adolescenten, echter zijn onderzoeksresultaten hieromtrent niet zo eenduidig. Toch stellen zowel beleidsmakers als academici sociale mediawijsheid voorop als de oplossing voor de dominante rol die sociale media spelen in het dagelijkse leven van adolescenten. In het algemeen wordt er verwacht dat sociale mediawijsheid een sleutelrol speelt in het tegengaan van de risico’s die gepaard gaan met socialemediagebruik, en er wordt dus verondersteld dat het in interactie treedt met socialemedia-effecten. Echter ontbreekt er systematisch bewijs dat zulk potentieel voor sociale mediawijsheid ondersteunt. Daarom had dit doctoraatsonderzoek als doel om een theoretisch kader te onwtikkelen en empirisch te testen omtrent de rol van sociale mediawijsheid in de socialemedia-effecten literatuur. Verder was het ook van belang om te begrijpen hoe adolescenten sociale mediawijsheid kunnen ontwikkelen door de interacties die ze hebben met verschillende agenten in hun omgeving. Dit doctoraat draagt dus zowel theoretisch als empirisch bij aan de snel evoluerende literatuur over sociale mediawijsheid.

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