Kuddegedrag op WhatsApp | Amsterdam University Press Journals Online
2004
Volume 51, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1384-6930
  • E-ISSN: 1875-7286

Abstract

Samenvatting

Jongeren doen online steeds vaker mee met cyberagressie. Zo maken ze bijvoorbeeld kwetsende opmerkingen of sturen ze ongewenst foto’s en filmpjes van anderen door. Waarom doen ze dit? Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van onderzoek naar de voorspellende factoren van deelname aan cyberagressie en hoe gedragsinterventies cyberagressie kunnen verminderen.

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