2004
Volume 25, Issue 1
  • E-ISSN: 1388-1302

Abstract

Samenvatting

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5117/THRM2022.1.VENH
2022-03-01
2022-12-07
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/13881302/25/1/THRM2022.1.VENH.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5117/THRM2022.1.VENH&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Åkerstedt, T. (2003). Shift work and disturbed sleep/wakefulness. Occupational medicine, 53(2), 89-94.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Åkerstedt, T., & Wright, K. P. (2009). Sleep loss and fatigue in shift work and shift work disorder. Sleep medicine clinics, 4(2), 257-271.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Åkerstedt, T., & Kecklund, G. (2017). What work schedule characteristics constitute a problem to the individual? A representative study of Swedish shift workers. Applied ergonomics, 59, 320-325.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Akour, A., Farha, R. A., Alefishat, E., Kasabri, V., Bulatova, N., & Naffa, R. (2017). Insulin resistance and levels of cardiovascular biomarkers in night-shift workers. Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 15(4), 283-290.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Albertsen, K., Rafnsdóttir, G. L., Grimsmo, A., Tómasson, K., & Kauppinen, K. (2008). Workhours and worklife balance. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 34(5), 14.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Albertsen, K., Garde, A. H., Nabe-Nielsen, K., Hansen, Å. M., Lund, H., & Hvid, H. (2014). Work-life balance among shift workers: results from an intervention study about self-rostering. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 87(3), 265-274.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Anderson, C., Grunstein, R. R., & Rajaratnam, S. M. (2013). Hours of work and rest in the rail industry. Internal medicine journal, 43(6), 717-721.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Arendt, J. (2010). Shift work: coping with the biological clock. Occupational medicine, 60(1), 10-20.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Bambra, C. L., Whitehead, M. M., Sowden, A. J., Akers, J., & Petticrew, M. P. (2008a). Shifting schedules: the health effects of reorganizing shift work. American journal of preventive medicine, 34(5), 427-434.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bambra, C., Whitehead, M., Sowden, A., Akers, J., & Petticrew, M. (2008b). “A hard day’s night?” The effects of Compressed Working Week interventions on the health and work-life balance of shift workers: a systematic review. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 62(9), 764-777.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Bell, L. B., Virden, T. B., Lewis, D. J., & Cassidy, B. A. (2015). Effects of 13-hour 20-minute work shifts on law enforcement officers’ sleep, cognitive abilities, health, quality of life, and work performance: The phoenix study. Police Quarterly, 18(3), 293-337.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Bjorvatn, B., Pallesen, S., Moen, B. E., Waage, S., & Kristoffersen, E. S. (2018). Migraine, tension-type headache and medication-overuse headache in a large population of shift working nurses: a cross-sectional study in Norway. BMJ open, 8(11).
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Blok, M. M., & De Looze, M. P. (2011). What is the evidence for less shift work tolerance in older workers?. Ergonomics, 54(3), 221-232.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Bonnefond, A., Härmä, M., Hakola, T., Sallinen, M., Kandolin, I., & Virkkala, J. (2006). Interaction of age with shift-related sleep-wakefulness, sleepiness, performance, and social life. Experimental aging research, 32(2), 185-208.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Buchvold, H. V., Pallesen, S., Øyane, N. M., & Bjorvatn, B. (2015). Associations between night work and BMI, alcohol, smoking, caffeine and exercise-a cross-sectional study. BMC public health, 15(1), 1112.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Buchvold, H. V., Pallesen, S., Waage, S., & Bjorvatn, B. (2018). Shift work schedule and night work load: Effects on body mass index-a four-year longitudinal study. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 44(3).
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Bukowska, A., Sobala, W., & Peplonska, B. (2015). Rotating night shift work, sleep quality, selected lifestyle factors and prolactin concentration in nurses and midwives. Chronobiology international, 32(3), 318-326.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. CBS. (2020). Gezondheid en zorggebruik. https://opendata.cbs.nl/statline/#/CBS/nl/dataset/83005NED/table?ts=1625664804839
  19. San Chang, Y., Wu, Y. H., Hsu, C. Y., Tang, S. H., Yang, L. L., & Su, S. F. (2011). Impairment of perceptual and motor abilities at the end of a night shift is greater in nurses working fast rotating shifts. Sleep medicine, 12(9), 866-869.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Chung, M. H., Kuo, T. B., Hsu, N., Chu, H., Chou, K. R., & Yang, C. C. (2011). Recovery after three-shift work: relation to sleep-related cardiac neuronal regulation in nurses. Industrial health, 1112030110-1112030110.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Dahlgren, A., Tucker, P., Gustavsson, P., & Rudman, A. (2016). Quick returns and night work as predictors of sleep quality, fatigue, work–family balance and satisfaction with work hours. Chronobiology international, 33(6), 759-767.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Devore, E. E., Grodstein, F., & Schernhammer, E. S. (2013). Shift work and cognition in the Nurses’ Health Study. American journal of epidemiology, 178(8), 1296-1300.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Dhaini, S. R., Denhaerynck, K., Bachnick, S., Schwendimann, R., Schubert, M., De Geest, S., & Simon, M., on behalf of the Match RN study group. (2018). Work schedule flexibility is associated with emotional exhaustion among registered nurses in Swiss hospitals: A cross-sectional study. International journal of nursing studies, 82, 99-105.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Dibner, C., Schibler, U., & Albrecht, U. (2010). The mammalian circadian timing system: organization and coordination of central and peripheral clocks. Ann Rev. Physiol., 72:517-549.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Drach-Zahavy, A., & Marzuq, N. (2013). The weekend matters: Exploring when and how nurses best recover from work stress. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(3), 578-589.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Driesen, K., Jansen, N. W., Kant, I., Mohren, D. C., & van Amelsvoort, L. G. (2010). Depressed mood in the working population: associations with work schedules and working hours. Chronobiology international, 27(5), 1062-1079.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Driscoll, T. R., Grunstein, R. R., & Rogers, N. L. (2007). A systematic review of the neurobehavioural and physiological effects of shiftwork systems. Sleep medicine reviews, 11(3), 179-194.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Flo, E., Pallesen, S., Moen, B. E., Waage, S., & Bjorvatn, B. (2014). Short rest periods between work shifts predict sleep and health problems in nurses at 1-year follow-up. Occupational and environmental medicine, 71(8), 555-561.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Folkard, S., & Tucker, P. (2003). Shift work, safety and productivity. Occupational medicine, 53(2), 95-101.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Garde, A. H., Albertsen, K., Nabe-Nielsen, K., Carneiro, I. G., Skotte, J., Hansen, S. M., Lund, H., Hvid, H., & Hansen, Å. M. (2012). Implementation of self-rostering (the PRIO project): effects on working hours, recovery, and health. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 314-326.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Garde, A. H., BegtrupL., Bjorvatn, B., Bonde, J, P,, Hansen, J., Hansen, A. M., et al. (2020). How to schedule night shift work in order to reduce health and safety risks. Scand J Work Environ Health. 1;46(6):557–69.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Geiger-brown, J., Muntaner, C., Lipscomb, J., & Trinkoff, A. (2004). Demanding work schedules and mental health in nursing assistants working in nursing homes. Work & Stress, 18(4), 292-304.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Gezondheidsraad. (2015). Nachtwerk en gezondheidsrisico’s: Mogelijkheden voor preventie.Den Haag: Gezondheidsraad. Publicatienr.2015/25.
  34. Gezondheidsraad. (2017). Gezondheidsrisico’s door nachtwerk. Den Haag: Gezondheidsraad. Publicatienr.2017/17.
  35. Giorgi, F., Mattei, A., Notarnicola, I., Petrucci, C., & Lancia, L. (2018). Can sleep quality and burnout affect the job performance of shift-work nurses? A hospital cross-sectional study. Journal of advanced nursing, 74(3), 698-708.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Gommans, F., Jansen, N., Stynen, D., de Grip, A., & Kant, I. (2015). The ageing shift worker: a prospective cohort study on need for recovery, disability, and retirement intentions. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 356-367.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Grundy, A., Richardson, H., Burstyn, I., Lohrisch, C., SenGupta, S. K., et al. (2013). Increased risk of breast cancer associated with long-term shift work in Canada. Occupational and environmental medicine, 70(12), 831-838.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Gu, F., Han, J., Laden, F., Pan, A., Caporaso, N. E., et al. (2015). Total and cause-specific mortality of US nurses working rotating night shifts. American journal of preventive medicine, 48(3), 241-252.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Hall, A. L., Franche, R. L., & Koehoorn, M. (2018). Examining exposure assessment in shift work research: a study on depression among nurses. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 62(2), 182-194.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Hansen, J. (2017). Night shift work and risk of breast cancer. Current environmental health reports, 4(3), 325-339.
    [Google Scholar]
  41. HärmäM, KarhulaK, RopponenA, PuttonenS, KoskinenA, et al. (2018). Association of changes in work shifts and shift intensity with change in fatigue and disturbed sleep: a within-subject study. Scand J Work Environ Health. 44(4):394-402. doi:10.5271/sjweh.3730
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Harris, R., Sims, S., Parr, J., & Davies, N. (2015). Impact of 12 h shift patterns in nursing: a scoping review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 52(2), 605-634.
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Heckman, C. J., Kloss, J. D., Feskanich, D., Culnan, E., & Schernhammer, E. S. (2017). Associations among rotating night shift work, sleep and skin cancer in Nurses’ Health Study II participants. Occupational and environmental medicine, 74(3), 169-175.
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Hulsegge, G., Picavet, H. S. J., van der Beek, A. J., Verschuren, W. M., Twisk, J. W., & Proper, K. I. (2019). Shift work, chronotype and the risk of cardiometabolic risk factors. European journal of public health, 29(1), 128-134.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Ingre, M., Åkerstedt, T., Ekstedt, M., & Kecklund, G. (2012). Periodic self-rostering in shift work: correspondence between objective work hours, work hour preferences (personal fit), and work schedule satisfaction. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 327-336.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Jankowiak, S., Backe, E., Liebers, F., Schulz, A., Hegewald, J., et al. (2016). Current and cumulative night shift work and subclinical atherosclerosis: results of the Gutenberg Health Study. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 89(8), 1169-1182.
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Jansen, B., & Baaijens, C. (2011). Zelfroosteren: noodzakelijke democratisering van de arbeidstijd. Tijdschrift voor HRM, 1, 55-72.
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Järvelin-Pasanen, S., Ropponen, A., Tarvainen, M., Paukkonen, M., Hakola, T., et al. (2013). Effects of implementing an ergonomic work schedule on heart rate variability in shift-working nurses. Journal of occupational health, 12-0250.
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Jensen, M. A., Garde, A. H., Kristiansen, J., Nabe-Nielsen, K., & Hansen, Å. M. (2016). The effect of the number of consecutive night shifts on diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV): a systematic review of field studies. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 89(4), 531-545.
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Jeong, I., Park, J. B., Lee, K. J., Won, J. U., Roh, J., & Yoon, J. H. (2018). Irregular work schedule and sleep disturbance in occupational drivers—A nationwide cross-sectional study. PloS one, 13(11), e0207154.
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Joyce, K., Pabayo, R., Critchley, J. A., & Bambra, C. (2010). Flexible working conditions and their effects on employee health and wellbeing. Cochrane database of systematic reviews, (2).
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Juda, M., Vetter, C., & Roenneberg, T. (2013). Chronotype modulates sleep duration, sleep quality, and social jet lag in shift-workers. Journal of biological rhythms, 28(2), 141-151.
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Kantermann, T., Juda, M., Vetter, C., & Roenneberg, T. (2010). Shift-work research: Where do we stand, where should we go?. Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 8(2), 95-105.
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Karhula, K., Härmä, M., Ropponen, A., Hakola, T., Sallinen, M., & Puttonen, S. (2016). Sleep and satisfaction in 8-and 12-h forward-rotating shift systems: Industrial employees prefer 12-h shifts. Chronobiology international, 33(6), 768-775.
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Karhula, K., Puttonen, S., Ropponen, A., Koskinen, A., Ojajärvi, A., Kivimäki, M., & Härmä, M. (2017). Objective working hour characteristics and work–life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study. Chronobiology international, 34(7), 876-885.
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Karhula, K., Koskinen, A., Ojajärvi, A., Ropponen, A., Puttonen, S., Kivimäki, M., & Härmä, M. (2018). Are changes in objective working hour characteristics associated with changes in work-life conflict among hospital employees working shifts? A 7-year follow-up. Occupational and environmental medicine, 75(6), 407-411.
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Kecklund, G., & Axelsson, J. (2016). Health consequences of shift work and insufficient sleep. Bmj, 355, i5210.
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Kiss, P., De Meester, M., & Braeckman, L. (2008). Differences between younger and older workers in the need for recovery after work. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 81(3), 311-320.
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Knauth, P., & Hornberger, S. (2003). Preventive and compensatory measures for shift workers. Occupational medicine, 53(2), 109-116.
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Knutsson, A. (2004). Methodological aspects of shift-work research. Chronobiology international, 21(6), 1037-1047.
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Krittanawong, C., Tunhasiriwet, A., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Farrell, et al. (2019). Association between short and long sleep durations and cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, 8(8), 762-770.
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Lajoie, P., Aronson, K. J., Day, A., & Tranmer, J. (2015). A cross-sectional study of shift work, sleep quality and cardiometabolic risk in female hospital employees. BMJ open, 5(3).
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Li, W., Ray, R. M., Thomas, D. B., Davis, S., Yost, M., et al. (2015). Shift work and breast cancer among women textile workers in Shanghai, China. Cancer Causes & Control, 26(1), 143-150.
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Lie, J. A. S., Kjuus, H., Zienolddiny, S., Haugen, A., Stevens, R. G., & Kjærheim, K. (2011). Night work and breast cancer risk among Norwegian nurses: assessment by different exposure metrics. American journal of epidemiology, 173(11), 1272-1279.
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Lie, J. A. S., Kjuus, H., Zienolddiny, S., Haugen, A., & Kjærheim, K. (2013). Breast cancer among nurses: is the intensity of night work related to hormone receptor status?. American journal of epidemiology, 178(1), 110-117.
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Lin, P. C., Chen, C. H., Pan, S. M., Pan, C. H., Chen, C. J., et al. (2012). Atypical work schedules are associated with poor sleep quality and mental health in Taiwan female nurses. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 85(8), 877-884.
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Lin, Y. C., Hsieh, I. C., & Chen, P. C. (2015a). Utilizing the metabolic count in workers’ health surveillance: an example of day-time vs. day-night rotating shift workers. International journal of occupational medicine and environmental health, 28(4), 675.
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Lin, Y. C., Chen, Y. C., Hsieh, H. I., & Chen, P. C. (2015b). Risk for work-related fatigue among the employees on semiconductor manufacturing lines. Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, 27(2), 1805-1818.
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Loef, B., Van Der Beek, A. J., Holtermann, A., Hulsegge, G., Van Baarle, D., & Proper, K. I. (2018). Objectively measured physical activity of hospital shift workers. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 44(3), 265-273.
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Mauss, D., Litaker, D., Jarczok, M. N., Li, J., Bosch, J. A., & Fischer, J. E. (2013). Anti-clockwise rotating shift work and health: Would you prefer 3-shift or 4-shift operation?. American journal of industrial medicine, 56(5), 599-608.
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Min, A., Min, H., & Hong, H. C. (2019). Work schedule characteristics and fatigue among rotating shift nurses in hospital setting: An integrative review. Journal of nursing management, 27(5), 884-895.
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Mohren, D. C. L., Jansen, N. W. H., & Kant, I. J. (2010). Need for recovery from work in relation to age: a prospective cohort study. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 83(5), 553-561.
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Nabe-Nielsen, K., Lund, H., Ajslev, J. Z., Hansen, Å. M., Albertsen, K., Hvid, H., & Garde, A. H. (2013). How do employees prioritise when they schedule their own shifts?. Ergonomics, 56(8), 1216-1224.
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Nicol, A. M., & Botterill, J. S. (2004). On-call work and health: a review. Environmental Health, 3(1), 1-7.
    [Google Scholar]
  75. Nijp, H. H., Beckers, D. G., Geurts, S. A., Tucker, P., & Kompier, M. A. (2012). Systematic review on the association between employee worktime control and work-non-work balance, health and well-being, and job-related outcomes. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 299-313.
    [Google Scholar]
  76. NVAB. (2020). Richtlijn nachtwerk en gezondheid. Richtlijn voor bedrijfsartsen. Utrecht: NVAB.
  77. Oh, J. I., & Yim, H. W. (2018). Association between rotating night shift work and metabolic syndrome in Korean workers: differences between 8-hour and 12-hour rotating shift work. Industrial health, 56(1), 40-48.
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Ohlander, J., Keskin, M. C., Stork, J., & Radon, K. (2015). Shift work and hypertension: prevalence and analysis of disease pathways in a German car manufacturing company. American journal of industrial medicine, 58(5), 549-560.
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Oyama, I., Kubo, T., Fujino, Y., Kadowaki, K., Kunimoto, M., et al. (2012). Retrospective cohort study of the risk of impaired glucose tolerance among shift workers. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 337-342.
    [Google Scholar]
  80. PanA, SchernhammerES, SunQ, HuFB (2011) Rotating Night Shift Work and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Two Prospective Cohort Studies in Women. PLoS Med 8(12): e1001141. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001141
    [Google Scholar]
  81. Papantoniou, K., Castaño-Vinyals, G., Espinosa, A., Aragonés, N., Pérez-Gómez, B., et al. (2015). Night shift work, chronotype and prostate cancer risk in the MCC-S pain case-control study. International journal of cancer, 137(5), 1147-1157.
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Papantoniou, K., Devore, E. E., Massa, J., Strohmaier, S., Vetter, C., et al. (2018). Rotating night shift work and colorectal cancer risk in the nurses’ health studies. International journal of cancer, 143(11), 2709-2717.
    [Google Scholar]
  83. Pellegrino, P., de Castro Moreno, C. R., & Marqueze, E. C. (2019). Aspects of work organization and reduced sleep quality of airline pilots. Sleep Science, 12(1), 43.
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Pisarski, A., & Barbour, J. P. (2014). What roles do team climate, roster control, and work life conflict play in shiftworkers’ fatigue longitudinally?. Applied ergonomics, 45(3), 773-779.
    [Google Scholar]
  85. Qureshi, H. A., Rawlani, R., Mioton, L. M., Dumanian, G. A., Kim, J. Y., & Rawlani, V. (2015). Burnout phenomenon in US plastic surgeons: risk factors and impact on quality of life. Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 135(2), 619-626.
    [Google Scholar]
  86. RoennebergT, MerrowM.Entrainment of the human circadian clock. Cold Spring Harb. Symp. Quant. Biol. 2007; 72: 293–9.
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Roenneberg, T., Kuehnle, T., Juda, M., Kantermann, T., Allebrandt, K., Gordijn, M., & Merrow, M. (2007). Epidemiology of the human circadian clock. Sleep medicine reviews, 11(6), 429-438.
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Ropponen, A., Narusyte, J., Mather, L., Mittendorfer-Rutz, E., Åkerstedt, T., & Svedberg, P. (2018). Night work as a risk factor for future cause-specific disability pension: A prospective twin cohort study in Sweden. Chronobiology international, 35(2), 249-260.
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Ropponen, A., Koskinen, A., Puttonen, S., & Härmä, M. (2019). Exposure to working-hour characteristics and short sickness absence in hospital workers: A case-crossover study using objective data. International journal of nursing studies, 91, 14-21.
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Saksvik, I. B., Bjorvatn, B., Hetland, H., Sandal, G. M., & Pallesen, S. (2011). Individual differences in tolerance to shift work–a systematic review. Sleep medicine reviews, 15(4), 221-235.
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Sallinen, M., & Kecklund, G. (2010). Shift work, sleep, and sleepiness—differences between shift schedules and systems. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 121-133.
    [Google Scholar]
  92. Schelvis, R. M., Hengel, K. M. O., Burdorf, A., Blatter, B. M., Strijk, J. E., & van der Beek, A. J. (2015). Evaluation of occupational health interventions using a randomized controlled trial: challenges and alternative research designs. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 491-503.
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Shan, Z., Li, Y., Zong, G., Guo, Y., Li, J., Manson, J. E., Hu, F. B., Willet, W. C., Schernhammer, E. S., & Bhupathiraju, S. N. (2018). Rotating night shift work and adherence to unhealthy lifestyle in predicting risk of type 2 diabetes: results from two large US cohorts of female nurses. bmj, 363.
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Shon, Y., Ryu, S., Suh, B. S., Kim, S. G., Kim, W. S., et al. (2016). Comparison of sleep quality based on direction of shift rotation in electronics workers. Annals of occupational and environmental medicine, 28(1), 37.
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Silva-Costa, A., Guimarães, J., Chor, D., da Fonseca, M. D. J. M., Bensenor, I., Santos, I., ... & Griep, R. H. (2018). Time of exposure to night work and carotid atherosclerosis: a structural equation modeling approach using baseline data from ELSA-Brasil. International archives of occupational and environmental health, 91(5), 591-600.
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Skogstad, M., Mamen, A., Lunde, L. K., Ulvestad, B., Matre, D., et al. (2019). Shift work including night work and long working hours in industrial plants increases the risk of atherosclerosis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(3), 521.
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Täht, K., & Mills, M. (2012). Nonstandard work schedules, couple desynchronization, and parent–child interaction: A mixed-methods analysis. Journal of Family Issues, 33(8), 1054-1087.
    [Google Scholar]
  98. Torquati, L., Mielke, G. I., Brown, W. J., & Kolbe-Alexander, T. (2018). Shift work and the risk of cardiovascular disease. A systematic review and meta-analysis including dose–response relationship. Scand J Work Environ Health. 2018:44(3):229–238. doi:10.5271/sjweh.3700
    [Google Scholar]
  99. Travis, R. C., Balkwill, A., Fensom, G. K., Appleby, P. N., Reeves, G. K., et al. (2016). Night shift work and breast cancer incidence: three prospective studies and meta-analysis of published studies. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 108(12), djw169.
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Tucker, P., Brown, M., Dahlgren, A., Davies, G., Ebden, P., et al. (2010). The impact of junior doctors’ worktime arrangements on their fatigue and well-being. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 458-465.
    [Google Scholar]
  101. Tucker, P., Bejerot, E., Kecklund, G., Aronsson, G., & Åkerstedt, T. (2015). The impact of work time control on physicians’ sleep and well-being. Applied ergonomics, 47, 109-116.
    [Google Scholar]
  102. Van Amelsvoort, L. G., Jansen, N. W., Swaen, G. M., Van Den Brandt, P. A., & Kant, I. (2004). Direction of shift rotation among three-shift workers in relation to psychological health and work-family conflict. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 149-156.
    [Google Scholar]
  103. Van de Ven, H. A., Bültmann, U., de Looze, M. P., Koolhaas, W., Kantermann, T., Brouwer, S., & van der Klink, J. J. (2015). Need for recovery among male technical distal on-call workers. Ergonomics, 58(12), 1927-1938.
    [Google Scholar]
  104. Van de Ven, H. A., Van Der Klink, J. J., Vetter, C., Roenneberg, T., Gordijn, et al. (2016a). Sleep and need for recovery in shift workers: do chronotype and age matter?. Ergonomics, 59(2), 310-324.
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Van de Ven, H. A., Brouwer, S., Koolhaas, W., Goudswaard, A., de Looze, M. P., et al. (2016b). Associations between shift schedule characteristics with sleep, need for recovery, health and performance measures for regular (semi-) continuous 3-shift systems. Applied ergonomics, 56, 203-212.
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Van de Ven, H. A., Hulsegge, G., Zoomer, T., de Korte, E. M., Burdorf, A., & Hengel, K. M. O. (2021). The acute effects of working time patterns on fatigue and sleep quality using daily measurements of 6195 observations among 223 shift workers. Scandinaviam Journal of Work, Environment and Health, Epub-21.
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Van Drongelen, A., Boot, C. R., Hlobil, H., Van Der Beek, A. J., & Smid, T. (2017). Cumulative exposure to shift work and sickness absence: associations in a five-year historic cohort. BMC public health, 17(1), 67.
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Van Kerkhof, L., W. M., van Drongelen, A., Dollé, M. E. T., & van de Ven, H. A. (2021). Zoals het klokje vroeger tikte…: Invloed van leeftijd op de gezondheidsrisico’s van Nachtwerk. Tijdschrift voor toegepaste Arbowetenschappen. 34(2), 3-24.
    [Google Scholar]
  109. Vedaa, Ø., Harris, A., Bjorvatn, B., Waage, S., Sivertsen, B., Tucker, P., & Pallesen, S. (2016). Systematic review of the relationship between quick returns in rotating shift work and health-related outcomes. Ergonomics, 59(1), 1-14.
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Vedaa, Ø., Mørland, E., Larsen, M., Harris, A., Erevik, E., et al. (2017a). Sleep detriments associated with quick returns in rotating shift work: a diary study. Journal of occupational and environmental medicine, 59(6), 522-527.
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Vedaa, Ø., Pallesen, S., Waage, S., Bjorvatn, B., Sivertsen, B., et al. (2017b). Short rest between shift intervals increases the risk of sick leave: a prospective registry study. Occupational and environmental medicine, 74(7), 496-501.
    [Google Scholar]
  112. Verbiest, S., Goudswaard, A., Kooij-de Bode, H., de Looze, M. P., Bosch, T., & Blok, M. (2013). Gezond, gezonder, gezondst? Wat zijn gezonde roosters. Tijdschrift voor HRM, 3, 16, 63, 77, 33.
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Vetter, C., Devore, E. E., Ramin, C. A., Speizer, F. E., Willett, W. C., & Schernhammer, E. S. (2015a). Mismatch of sleep and work timing and risk of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 38(9), 1707-1713.
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Vetter, C., Fischer, D., Matera, J. L., & Roenneberg, T. (2015b). Aligning work and circadian time in shift workers improves sleep and reduces circadian disruption. Current Biology, 25(7), 907-911.
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Viitasalo, K., Kuosma, E., Laitinen, J., & Härmä, M. (2008). Effects of shift rotation and the flexibility of a shift system on daytime alertness and cardiovascular risk factors. Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, 198-205.
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Viitasalo, K., Puttonen, S., Kuosma, E., Lindström, J., & Härmä, M. (2015). Shift rotation and age–interactions with sleep–wakefulness and inflammation. Ergonomics, 58(1), 65-74.
    [Google Scholar]
  117. Wang, D., Ruan, W., Chen, Z., Peng, Y., & Li, W. (2018). Shift work and risk of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality: A dose–response meta-analysis of cohort studies. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 25(12), 1293-1302.
    [Google Scholar]
  118. Wendeu-Foyet, M. G., Bayon, V., Cénée, S., Trétarre, B., Rébillard, X., et al. (2018). Night work and prostate cancer risk: results from the EPICAP Study. Occupational and environmental medicine, 75(8), 573-581.
    [Google Scholar]
  119. Williams, C. (2008). Work-life balance of shift workers. Perspectives on Labour and Income, 20(3), 15.
    [Google Scholar]
  120. Wuyts, J., De Valck, E., Vandekerckhove, M., Pattyn, N., Exadaktylos, V., et al. (2012). Effects of pre-sleep simulated on-call instructions on subsequent sleep. Biological psychology, 91(3), 383-388.
    [Google Scholar]
  121. Ziebertz, C. M., van Hooff, M. L., Beckers, D. G., Hooftman, W. E., Kompier, M. A., & Geurts, S. A. (2015). Research Article The Relationship of On-Call Work with Fatigue, Work-Home Interference, and Perceived Performance Difficulties.
    [Google Scholar]
  122. Ziebertz, C. M., Beckers, D. G., Van Hooff, M. L., Kompier, M. A., & Geurts, S. A. (2017). The effect on sleep of being on-call: an experimental field study. Journal of sleep research, 26(6), 809-815.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5117/THRM2022.1.VENH
Loading
/content/journals/10.5117/THRM2022.1.VENH
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error