2004
Volume 94, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0025-9454
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2816

Abstract

Abstract

People can experience everyday discrimination based on a number of characteristics. In this study, there will be a focus on everyday discrimination based on gender and religion. The interaction between gender and religion is the most current within Islam, therefore, the intersectional relationship between sexism and Islamophobia will be studied. A situation test was designed which was non-paired (random assignment) and has been performed 807 times. Test persons with three different profiles (a white male without an Islamic symbol, a white female without an Islamic symbol and a white female with an Islamic symbol) asked coincidental by-passers (white males without an Islamic symbol) if they could use their phone to send a text message. The results show that the white female without Islamic symbol have odds that are 6.0 times as high for experiencing that the request is granted, odds that are 5.1 times as low for experiencing that the by-passers do not physically give the phone and odds that are 3.2 times as low for experiencing doubt before the request is granted in comparison to the white male without Islamic symbol. The differences in responses were not significantly different between the white female with Islamic symbol and the white male without Islamic symbol. Benevolent sexism (towards the white female without Islamic symbol) and Islamophobia (towards the white female with Islamic symbol) are present.

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2019-06-01
2021-06-24
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): everyday discrimination; Ghent; islamophobia; sexism; situation test

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