2004
Volume 96, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0025-9454
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2816

Abstract

Abstract

This research set out to determine to what extent the relationship between working in a greenhouse gas intensive sector and climate policy scepticism can be explained by economic insecurity, while also examining the contextual influence of national commitment to climate change mitigation. Focusing on the lower educated of 21 European countries ( = 10.060) and conducting two multilevel analyses, this research found that working in a greenhouse gas intensive sector leads to more climate policy scepticism. This substantiates the idea that values of climate change scepticism are more present in the social environment of more greenhouse gas intensive sectors. This relationship is, however, not substantially explained by economic insecurity. Finally, this research found that working in a greenhouse gas intensive sector does not lead to more economic insecurity and that this relationship is only partially and minimally influenced by an extensive national climate policy agenda.

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2022-11-28
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