2004
Volume 97 Number 4
  • ISSN: 0025-9454
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2816

Abstract

Abstract

In this article we study to what extent intersectional sex- and country of origin differences in non-employment in the Netherlands are mediated by social capital. Hypotheses are formulated based on literature concerning intersectionality, social resources, traditional gender roles and homogeneous social preferences. We expect that certain groups are more vulnerable to non-employment than other groups, in part because fewer of their strong social ties are currently active in the labour market. We estimated structural equation models using data from the LISS-panel. We find that having fewer ties that have paid employment is linked to a higher chance of being non-employed. Moreover, we find that people from certain social groups have a higher chance of being unemployed. For women with a non-western migration background we find that a part of the higher risk for non-employment can be attributed to a lack of social capital.

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